www.MethowValley.org

User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

page1_image1.jpg
Last edited by tristanbgilb on Sat Jan 07, 2023 7:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

SIXTY-NINTH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY

It is now June 15, 1995. I am 87 years old and Leonard is 90. Leonard is living in the Vista View Rest Home since August 1994. We had our 69th Wedding Anniversary at the rest home on May 11, 1995. We had a beautiful day and so much love and happiness wished upon us. We had our pictures taken and a write up was presented in the Tri-City Herald newspaper. Dale and family are in Iowa and going well. Aaron will begin his second year at college in the Fall. Danny has a job and has his own apartment. Larrisa is very good in sports and music. She is tall and slender. Dale is still working in a rest home. Blaine still has his church in Hamburg, Iowa and they have a new home. I asked their son, Aaron, why he picked being a mortician as a career. "Well Grandma, its good pay and there is always a job."

Robert Gilbert, my nephew and his family have helped me so much with my Life Story. I really appreciate their help. Robert with the story, Dorrene, Robert's wife, and son, Rick, helped with the cover.

I am living with Bonnie in a real nice apartment in Kennewick. We get along great and she takes good care of me. Gilbert and Elaine take care of all of us. I have my ticket to Heaven and I am just waiting to use it. Give God Praise and Glory.

THE JOURNEY OF JOY This is my Grampa Gilbert's sister's autobiography as written by my Dad's brother

GOLD by FRANK HEATH FRANK Austin gave me the duty of preserving his grampa's book. This book documents the gold rush of the Methow Valley.

Freedom of Self Expression This is the journal I kept in the loony bin.

BAK COUNTRY MINES by Harvey Austin This is the diary Harvey kept as he worked the mines at the end of Twisp River Road.

Memoirs of a DEAD Man THIS IS A STORY OF SOMEONE I ONCE KNEW

TREASURE map FRANK AUSTIN gave me his mining papers TUNNEL map Wolverine Plan of operation QUIT CLAIM DEED Twisp River Org --My Active Mineral Claim

BOB Marley Coloring BookImage
Last edited by tristanbgilb on Sun Aug 15, 2021 7:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

SIXTIETH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY

On May 11, 1986, Gilbert and Elaine, Paul and Bonnie gave us our 60th wedding anniversary celebration at the Columbia Community Church of God. I told Bonnie that they should not do anything for our 60th because they had done such a beautiful celebration for our 50th anniversary. She told me to just stay out of it, because everything was going to be a surprise for us. We were to be at the church at 2 P.M..
When we arrived, everything was a surprise. Leonard's family came. His family that came from Condon, Oregon was Lenore, his sister-in- law, his two nieces, Alice Marie and Janet, and one of Alice Marie's sons (she had seven children). Many friends, neighbors and relatives also came to honor us during this celebration. June Blankenship and family provided the top, Precious Moments, for our cake. Beverly Hartley and family brought some beautiful flowers. We received many lovely cards and gifts of money. It was such a precious day. Guy's family teased me about going for our 70th wedding anniversary.
Marsha McCoy, Leslie and Helen's youngest daughter, made the mints after she came from Sacramento and became very tired afterwards. She said she was never going to make any more mints for a wedding. I asked her, "How about our 70th, would she make them for that." So she promised that she would.

Leonard and I both felt very special and loved by this special celebration provided and supported by our relatives, friends and church brethren. We were moved by the special love demonstrated by those who traveled long distances at considerable expense to honor us during this occasion. Their names are recorded in our guest book. I pray that God will richly bless and keep each one of them in His precious care.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

FIFTIETH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY

I cannot close this without telling about the wonderful 50th wedding anniversary celebration the children gave us. We repeated our vows, everything was so beautiful and we felt so loved. It was held in our Columbia Community Church on West Kennewick Avenue. Now we have six months to go for our 60th and are still so very much in love. Each year brings us closer together. Our children are so good to us and do so many nice things for us. We have three great grandchildren, Daniel Leonard, Aaron Nathaniel, and Larissa Joy. We are so proud of them and thank God every day for them and for being so good and loving to us. To know that each day we have such a dear wonderful Father, Jesus, and the Holy Spirit, the Blessed Trinity, watching over us, loving, compassionate, forgiving and to know that we really belong to Him.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

HEARTACHES

I don't think there was ever a family closer than ours. We celebrated every event and made such a beautiful day of it. We were so excited over Daniel Leonard's coming after losing our beloved Dewey Clark. We were so anxious for another baby.

Danny was a strong healthy baby. He and I were so close. He was an Eagle Scout. After each trip he went on he would call me the minute he got home saying, "Hi Grandma, this is Dan!" telling me about his trips, the pictures he took, and the fun things. In the night I still hear him say, "Hi Grandma, this is Dan!"

He loved bugs of all kinds. Elaine is very frightened of any of them. When we heard a shriek, we knew Danny had found a treasure to show his mom. He was such a big tease. He delivered newspapers for a long time. He would set his alarm, deliver his papers early in the morning, come home, reset his alarm to rest, and go to Sunday School and Church. He finally got his family to go to Church with him.

We could hardly stand it when Danny went to Vietnam. But he felt he had to do it. He loved his country and did not want the war to spread to America. Leonard retired in July 9, 1969. July 12, 1969 our Danny was killed in Vietnam. He gave his life to save others. He did not suffer, but was killed instantly. Ten medals were awarded Gilbert and Elaine following Danny's death, including the Purple Heart and the Silver Star. The new armory in Pasco is named after Dan. Gilbert and Elaine published Dan's correspondence home in a book entitled, Letters from Nam.

Edgar and Guy were very close. There was just one house between them, Edgar's first Kennewick home. They would take walks together, drink coffee, and finally nap in their chairs watching television. They did this until Edgar fell and broke his hip. Marcella was so good to


Edgar, spending hours caring for him and making him comfortable. I appreciated how good she was to him. She only had him in the rest home after she had fallen and broken her wrist. It almost broke my heart when a progression of strokes eventually left him so that he could no longer recognize me. Marcella's brother, Victor Rogers, stopped in every day from work and had prayer and sang songs with Edgar.

My brother Guy died November 24, 1972. My brother Edgar died on February 2, 1974. Mary Dana was killed in an auto accident in 1972. In the same accident, Dale's baby Mary Katharine was still born.

Barrie Francis Pickett was killed August 31, 1973 in a car accident in San Jose, California. He was in the navy and preparing to go out on the Kitty Hawk. The Kitty Hawk suffered several tragic incidents that could have caused serious injury to Barrie. One never gets over the loss of our darlings, but God gives comfort and I will see them someday. I praise Him that none of them suffered.

After Danny was killed in Vietnam, I became very sick and nearly died. Dale really told me off, and good. She said, "Grandma, you always told us about God and his great love, and goodness." "But you are not acting like a Christian!" "You are so full of self pity that you are killing yourself and hurting your whole family!" It really started me thinking and praying. I prayed for forgiveness and began to get better.

We lost our first Grandson, Dewey Clark, when he was less than a day old. It was such a sad time and I always wondered if he would remain a baby or grow into a child or an adult. As a new baby cannot see or do anything for them, I was concerned that they should not remain so helpless in heaven.

On one of my sleepless nights, I begged God to give me a glimpse of Heaven, remembering how he had helped me when Papa had passed away. I knew when Jesus took me by the hand and led me into Heaven. I'll never forget the sky so blue, the flowers so colorful and the music so beautiful. I realized that I had never before heard such beautiful music. Soon I was in the presence of people with such happy faces.
Love, peace, and praise was there.


I caught sight of two young men talking together. I knew Danny at once, but couldn't tell who the other young man was. I asked Jesus, "Who is the tall man standing next to Danny?" Jesus replied, "That is Dewey Clark." I said, "Of course, he looks like Danny, only a little bit taller." I saw so many people, relatives, friends, and neighbors. It was so wonderful. I also saw other family members and loved ones, but was not able to recognize everyone.

I wish I had the words to describe Heaven to you. The lights, the beautiful colors, the flowers of such beauty, and music. You have never heard such beautiful music. The joy, peace, and happiness on all the faces that are there. How I look forward to that day. What a day of rejoicing that will be.

I wasn't there very long and then Jesus said, "It is time to go back now." It was so peaceful and lovely there. I didn't want to leave. I could still hear this beautiful music, fading off in the distance.

Then I realized I was home in my own bed. Leonard was awake and up. I asked him if he could hear that Heavenly music. He said that he did not hear anything. As the music finally drifted away, I felt peace and soon went to sleep.

I felt guilty because I didn't want to leave Heaven. I talked to Pastor Smatlak about this. He said it was only natural for me to want to remain, but that I should realize that Jesus wanted me to witness more for him on earth.

I now feel better prepared to enter the gates of Heaven to stay. I didn't see Jesus's face, but I felt His nail scarred hand as he took my hand in his. How I love Him and know that He loves me, that I am His child. He is always with us, day and night. He never leaves us alone and never gives us more than we can bear. Praise His Holy Name.

When our Grandson, Daniel Leonard, was killed in Vietnam, our hearts were broken. He was so close to us. I still couldn't seem to cope with it like I should. It was hard for me to eat or sleep. I lost so much weight. I didn't realize what I was putting my family through, especially


Leonard. He had his own grief to go through and was also so worried about me.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

MY FAMILY IN 1968

Gilbert has been working for General Electric for fourteen years and Paul is working for the Foremost Dairy Company in Portland. He and Bonnie have bought a new home in Vancouver, Washington.

My sister Bertha passed away in 1958. She was such a sweet sister and I miss her so. Daniel graduated and completed a year of college at Montana University. He is presently in the Army and stationed at Fort Lewis, Washington. Dana is in the sixth grade. Dale graduates this year and then will take up nursing at Columbia Basin College in Pasco, Washington. Barrie is now fourteen years old and nearly ready to enter high school.

Here I am at age of sixty-one. I have a wonderful, kind, and loving husband who still works for the Northern Pacific Railroad. I have four precious grand children. I love all of them very much and pray that my precious Saviour will guide and take care of them all. This is my story up to this date. My life has seen it's sorrows, but there have been so many joys. And through sorrows and joys, God has always been with us, loving and good. God is good.

I stopped my story in 1968. I thought that was a good place to stop. I have experienced so much happiness but yet suffered many heart aches and sorrows. Yet through it all God has given us strength to go through all we had to go through. He has given so many things to thank and praise him for. We have had so many wonderful times together. It is so necessary to a good family life, to love and help each other. Bob Gilbert, my brother Edgar's oldest son, and our daughter, Bonita Joy, have helped me much with this manuscript. They think it is unfinished, so I will add more.

When Dale Joy was born, Elaine called us up and said the water sack had burst. We took off for Richland as fast as we could go. We picked


her up and started for the Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Pasco. On the way we traveled past a little cafe. Elaine said she would love to have a hamburger. My nerves and stomach were just jumping. I couldn't believe she could be so calm.

Dale Joy loved all of us. She did not like to be rocked and she loved to run away. Mama Gilbert lived only long enough to hold Dale Joy one time. Dale Joy would tackle anything. When she was older, she wanted to cut my hair. Grandpa said no, but I didn't mind because I knew it would grow back. She cut and cut and I began to think I would be bald. But when she finished, it looked really nice. She loved baby sitting and always wanted to be a nurse. She went through the Girl Scouts.

Mary Dana was a surprise baby and a tiny little one. She loved all of us, but was more of a mama's and daddy's girl. She didn't like to stay with us like the other kids did. She would cry for her folks. I think one reason was that she had bad choking spells and had to be watched a lot. Dana and I had a lot of fun as she got older. She would stay nights with me and tell me ghost stories. She loved horror movies.

We went on a trip to Fox, Oregon to see Elaine's mother and stepfather. Dana and I had so much fun together. She took care of me on that trip. We went to an old log cabin and she pulled square nails for me. We explored an old house and an old fort. We had so much fun, and I felt closer to her than I ever had and I loved her even more. She and I had a ball when we went fishing with Gilbert. She was in scouts and played the piano. We loved them all in the same way, but each one had a different personality and each one had their own place in our hearts.

Barrie and Grandpa had such a close relationship together. He called him Ba. Bonnie and Barrie went agate hunting with us. When he was quite young, his little legs would get tired and Grandpa would take him piggy back. The Mabton hill was very steep and curvy. At the bottom was a little cafe. Barrie would go to sleep, but as tired as he was, he would always wake up before we got to the cafe, because he knew he would get a hamburger and a milk shake.


Paul, Bonnie, and Barrie lived in the house just west of us. We had a little path between the cherry trees. When he didn't think Bonnie was watching, Barrie would run to our house as fast as he could run. He generally came about the time we were having bacon and eggs. He gave us lots of love, and even after he was older, he would hug and kiss Grandpa and me, no matter how many kids he was with.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

HARVESTING GRAPES

When Barrie was little, I was picking grapes. Grandpa wanted to surprise me on my birthday. He made a nice roast dinner. Elaine, Gilbert, and family came in with a big birthday cake. Grandpa told Barrie not to tell me anything so that he could surprise me. The minute I drove up, Barrie ran up to the car and told me the whole story. He stopped talking and covered his face with both hands and said, "Grandma, please don't tell Grandpa nossing." It gave all of us a big laugh.

I picked grapes and tied grapes for years. I could pick 100 lugs per day on good vines. We picked frozen grapes in fog, rain, snow, hail, and sunshine. It had to be a little warmer to tie them, or the limbs would break when frozen. We surely worked hard, but had a lot of fun. There were six of us women that picked together as a team. When we picked and tied in Benton City, Sylvia Egbert and I took turns driving, her one week and I the next. I did not like that long a drive. Now they have machines to pick the grapes. They can pick all the grapes from a row in ten minutes. The machine shakes the grapes clean.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

SPOKANE LILAC FESTIVALS

When Bobbie was in the high school band, Edgar and I would go watch the band performance at the Lilac Festival in Spokane. We would pick up Veva and Bertha and all go to watch the parade. We always had so much fun and enjoyed seeing Bobbie march and play in the band.
Sometimes we had lovely weather and sometimes rain and cold.

One time, Jackie (Johnnie and Joyce Bongart's son) went with us. As the parade was finished and we were leaving for home, we passed lots of girls that had been in the parade. There were tumblers and twirlers, and so forth. Jackie would wolf whistle at them and hide on the floor of the car. They would see only Edgar and they would glare at him. Edgar was very embarrassed and would try to look very dignified.

One year Donella went with us and wore a hoop skirt. It took up most of the back seat and was in the way all day. Donella and I got the giggles. After Guy retired, he went with us. Leonard always had to work. Decoration day we all went to the Latah cemetery and to Rockford where Great-Grandpa and Great-Grandma Tozier were buried. We always took lots of flowers and the five of us spent the day together. Marcella could not go because she always had too much work to do.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

GRANDCHILDREN

On December 19, 1948, Daniel Leonard was born. He was such a strong healthy baby. We loved him so much. Two years later on December 12, 1950 a baby girl was born, Dale Joy. We were so happy and thrilled as she was so healthy and strong. When she was still tiny, my mother passed away after a stroke. Although we missed her terribly, we knew she was in Heaven. She was such a good Christian.

When Dale was a baby, Gilbert became really sick with bleeding ulcers. The doctor had to remove 3/4 of his stomach. He was given only a 50/50 chance to live. They kept giving him blood, but it just would not bring up his blood count. He had a very rare blood type and they were running out as he needed a lot during the operation. We put it on TV and radio. You just cannot believe how people responded. They went to the hospital, came to the house, and called by phone. People can be so wonderful when you really need help. We had plenty of blood and Gilbert came through the operation really well. He had to eat strained and baby food for a long time. He didn't get sick very often, but when he did, it took God's miracle to bring him through.

For a good many years, black people were not allowed to stay in Kennewick. If they came in by train, they were put back on the train and sent to Pasco. When Danny was little, I took him and Dale to a parade in Pasco. There was a small black boy standing close to us.
Danny loudly said to me, "That boy is black, Grandma. He doesn't have to wash his face." I wanted to hide some place.

When Dale was just a baby, Mama held her only one time. My little Mama was quite well up until she had a stroke and spent about 4 weeks in the hospital. During these 4 weeks she was in a coma and never knew she was paralyzed.

Before she had this stroke, I would go up Edgar's where Mama was living and stay with her one day each week. I would give her lots of love, bathe her, wash her hair and comb it, clean her room, and I always made custard pies for her.


Her hair was a beautiful pure white and so long it reached below her shoulders with waves near the ends. We had such nice days together. You would have liked my little Mama. She always thought she should wear blue, black, or brown colors. We finally got her into a pink coat and a lilac colored dress. She looked so pretty in them with her white hair.

When Veva and I were young, the older men around Latah would tell us, "You girls are nice looking, but you don't hold a candle to your mother." It always made us so happy and proud.

Mama's room was in the south west corner of Edgar's house. Mama raised several different kinds of cactus plants that had beautiful blossoms during the winters. She also loved growing large green ferns in her room. She grew African violets that bloomed during the winter in many different colors.

Marcella was always very thoughtful and good to Mama. She was happy in Edgar's home and helped with the children and work, until it was too hard for her to do it. I have always had such a deep love for my nieces and nephews. We were all very loving and close.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

PAUL

On August 31, 1949, Bonnie married Paul Pickett. After being married only seven weeks they became involved in a severe auto accident in which Bonnie was seriously injured. Her right leg was fractured to the extent that it required surgery. Later, Doctor Lih showed us the x-rays of her leg on a Saturday and still there was no healing. He requested permission to amputate her leg on the next Monday. We were frantic. I called several churches for prayers.

I went into the big First Methodist Church in Kennewick and alone there I prayed for our Bonnie's leg. I looked up at the picture of Jesus on the wall. Jesus spoke to me saying, "Every thing is all right."

When we went to the hospital Monday morning, Doctor Lih met us and was very excited and relieved. He showed us newly taken x-rays, and praise the Lord, there was a lot of healing that had taken place. Doctor Lih said that he would not need to amputate and that he was going to put her leg in a cast. Again our precious Lord answered our prayers and saved her leg. How wonderful our blessed Savior is to us, and how much He cares. We never give Him enough praise.

She was in a body cast after traction, then went to a brace, crutches, and a cane. But, thank God, she can now walk without limping.

Paul had to go into the Marines and when he came home he worked for Safeway. Barrie Francis was born April 9, 1955, and was such a joy to them. We all loved him dearly. Gilbert's children have been so good to Barrie and Barrie adores them. When Mary Dana was born to Gilbert and Elaine, August 21, 1957, Barrie always called her his little sister.
They love to play together and Barrie took good care of her.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

THE FLOOD OF 1948

In 1948 the Columbia River flooded and almost reached our home. It came clear up between Entiat and Fruitland Streets. Every day, Leonard and I would go down and measure it. One night at 2:00 a.m. the call car came through ordering everyone on the north side of the railroad tracks to evacuate. Several of our neighbors panicked and started loading their cars. Leonard decided we should wait awhile, because the water had not raised since evening. So we all calmed down, and soon afterwards the water began to recede. The National Guards were posted on every road as an effort to control looting. We had to sign in and out every time we left our place. Guy and Marie owned a trailer court a few blocks to the east of our home that was under water. They had to evacuate. Later a dike was built to prevent future flooding and most of the homes by the river had to be moved because of water backed up by the construction of McNary Dam dedicated by President Eisenhower in 1955. Much of the land was converted into Columbia Park.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

ELAINE

In 1946, Gilbert came home from Japan, so I quit work to be with him as much as possible. He had reenlisted and then went to California.
While there he met Elaine Louise Young (a WAC in the US Army) and they were married.

When he brought her home, she got off the train and walked right into our hearts, and to this day she is still there. I guess I'm an odd mother- in-law, but I can't find any fault in her. She is a perfect wife and mother, and we love her dearly. Her first baby, Dewey Clark, was born September 11, 1947. We all wanted him so very much. It nearly broke all of our hearts to lose him. He was such a beautiful baby that I feel God had need of him in Heaven.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

WORLD WAR II

I worked in Pasco at the Pasco Holding and Reconsignment Plant for five years. First I worked as a checker and then storekeeper. I started in 1941 and worked until 1946. I stopped working to be home when Gilbert was on furlough from the Army. I enjoyed working there. It could get hot and it could really get cold.

We had a blizzard one January and we had to take our shift of working outside. We had to crawl through the tires to count them as they were covered with snow. They had six big warehouses and the railroad cars would bring war supplies to be stacked in the warehouses and restacked in railroad cars as orders came in. The checkers had to record the length, width, and capacity of each car and write the name of the seal from each car as well as describe the contents of each car, how it was loaded, and count each piece. The storekeepers had to tell them where to put the loads in the warehouse with respect to high piling and square footage. There were 15 bays (large spaces) in each warehouse. When the Colonel or Major called, the storekeepers were supposed to know where every load was, what size railroad car it would take to load it, etc.

We had a lot of Italian prisoners there and they worked at loading and unloading cars. I was always a little afraid of them as they were sullen and mean. They were fed well and paid a small wage for working in the cars, but they thought they should get as much money as the crews did. They would strike and get so mean. We women checkers and store keepers were afraid of them. They had so much freedom and so much food, including meat. We were rationed for meat and could have very little. They would have big hams and bacon slabs hanging in their camps. They were furnished cigarettes. It sure hurt us when we knew how our boys were being treated. One of the Italian prisoners, named Mario, fell in love with one of the women in the office. He cried every day and mourned his Italy. After he left and went home, he wrote that


he wanted to come back. His Italy was all torn up and the beauty was gone.

I still must smile when I think about a freight car that was to be unloaded into the warehouse, because my checkers couldn't get the correct count. The Major and the Colonel became so annoyed that they became quite stern with the checkers. Eventually they were so frustrated that they decided to do the counting themselves. They became even more frustrated when they also could not get the correct count. We later learned that the prisoners were creating the confusion by intentionally mixing up the stock.

When I was working at Big Pasco Holding and Reconsignment Point, I had to leave real early in the morning to be there and have my door opened by seven a.m. Bonnie had to get Gilbert up and Gilbert would be angry with her for wakening him, even though she had his breakfast ready. Leonard told him that the next time Gilbert did not get up that Bonnie would pour a bucket of water over his head. He woke up the next morning and it was pouring rain. He thought Bonnie was really getting him wet. He yelled, "I'm getting up, I'm getting up right now!"

We worked six to seven days a week and sometimes twelve to fourteen hours a day. During this time, Leonard was working two extra night shifts each week. The Second World War was at its very worst at this time, and in 1945, Gilbert went into the Army. Just before he went to Japan, the War ended. He still went over to help clean up, as some of the Japanese were still fighting. Some of them were in caves and didn't even know the war was over.

We were so thankful when Gilbert came home safely. I could not believe how well he took care of his clothes. Before he went into the service, I could find one sock under the bed and one under the bathtub. When he came home, he took each piece off and hung it on a hanger.
He was showing Bonnie some Judo tricks he learned in the service. She did not want him to, but he told her he would not hurt her. He threw her over his head, right into a tree. She said she felt undignified in front of the audience.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

MOVE TO THE GARDEN TRACT

In 1944, we sold our little farm on South Gum Street and moved to the Garden Tract which at that time was in prune, cherry, and peach trees. It is located on Entiat Street in Kennewick where we lived until 1990. I was still working and so we really had to work far into the nights to get ourselves moved.

We had 24 Bing cherry trees when we moved to the Garden Tracts. I picked a lot and sold them to Safeway Grocery Store. We also had people pick their own for ten cents per pound. We always sold all of them. The cherries were beautiful. People came and picked them for ten cents per pound. A lady in a station wagon stopped and asked if she could pick cherries. I told her I had plenty left on the trees. Out of the wagon came five children. The lady asked if she could still pick cherries. I told here the children could eat and pick all they wanted, but that they shouldn't remove the leaves from the trees. I led them to a tree that was really loaded with cherries. She had stopped at several places and they wouldn't let her pick because of her children. They did a good job of picking, and I enjoyed them.

In November 1948, the weather had been very warm. Our Bing cherry trees were budded out. Also the roses developed buds that were beginning to open. Along came a killing frost that froze every one of our 24 cherry trees. It looked like a giant axe had split every tree wide open. Leonard had to take every tree out by the roots, stumps, and all by shovel and dragging with an old car that we had. He put the property into lawn. What a job that was. That same frost killed our apricots. We never had many fruit trees after that, except a few dwarf peaches and apricots.

When we moved to the garden tracts in 1944, our neighbors to the east of us were two elderly unmarried women. They had one cow and some chickens. They had to be gone a day or two. They asked us to feed the


chickens and milk the cow. I never laughed so hard in my life as when Leonard tried to milk that cow. She had never been milked by a man before. They went around and around the corral. I finally ended up milking her. Most of the children were afraid of the sisters, but our grandchildren loved them and would talk to them over the fence. Their names were Nettie and Mamie Barnes, and the kids would say, "Hello Miss Barnes."

We had a chicken house and the Barnes sisters had one too. There was a path between the two chicken houses that had been made by rats. We set traps and caught some of them, but we could not keep up with them. One night I forgot to fill a bucket full of water as I usually did. The next morning there were eight rats drowned in the little bit of water left in the bucket. They crawled into the bucket for water, but could not crawl out and drowned in the shallow water at the bottom of the bucket. So every night we followed this plan and we were soon rid of rats. We also put lye powder in the path. This burned the rat's feet and they would lick them and then die. It was such a relief to get rid of them. I hate rats and mice.

We had a bad scare when grasshoppers were moving from Kahlotus toward Pasco and Kennewick. Leonard and I drove out close to where they were and it was very frightening. They changed their course at the very last as they were destroying everything within a wide radius in their path. Pioneer stories tell how the grasshoppers took every bit of grain, vegetables, and fruit trees and then laid their eggs which hatched the next spring.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

EDGAR'S FAMILY

Edgar married Marcella Rogers in 1936. Edgar and Gert had one daughter, Jean. Marcella and Edgar later had Robert, Donella, and Grant. During the charivari for Edgar and Marcella, Marcella's brother, Arthur, invited everyone to bring empty tin cans and throw them around the yard. One hit me in the face, broke my glasses, and cut my eye. Otherwise we had a good time, but left an awful mess.

I gave Edgar and Marcella's children, Bobbie, Donella, and Grant, their first baths after they were brought home from the hospital. I enjoyed them so much. Donella had such deep dimples and always said the right one was mine. If anyone would ask her if they could have a dimple, she would always say, "Not the right one. That one belongs to Auntie Elma."

Jean was very good to help Marcella. Jean was happy to have Bobbie, Donella, and Grant and loved them so dearly. Mama lived with Edgar and Marcella's family in Kennewick. Because Marcella taught school, Edgar and Marcella's children were left at home with Mama until they started school. Mama also helped take care of all of her grandchildren in times of sickness, birth of babies, or other needs.

When Donella was quite young, she would slip into Jean's bra, grasp Jean's purse, climb up onto a chair to reach the wall telephone, lift up the receiver, and proudly announce to the central that she was Jean Gilbert. When Jean discovered what had happened, she was very embarrassed. Donella always idolized her older sister Jean.

When Donella was a toddler she pulled a boiling hot cup of coffee from the breakfast table onto herself. Edgar and Marcella poured cold water on the burned area, covered her burned skin with butter, and took her to the Doctor deBit. Dr. deBit praised them for their treatment and said that if untreated Donella's scars would have been more severe.

One time Bobbie locked Donella out of the house. Donella was so determined to get back into the house that she pushed her hand and arm through the window in the door, causing a deep slash in her wrist.


Because she was afraid of getting into trouble, she ran into the back yard and hid in the bushes. Marcella saw the broken window and asked Bobbie what had happened. After he told her, she saw the blood and frantically called Edgar to help her search for Donella. Donella remained silent in fear of being disciplined for breaking the window.
Marcella and Edgar were so relieved when they finally found Donella and were so busy attending to her injury, that they did not punish her.

Donella used to enjoy hiding under the kitchen table and listening to the adult conversations. A neighbor came to visit and bought their Boston Bull Terrier, Bosco, into the house with them. Bosco went under the table where Donella was hiding, and lifted his leg and marked the table leg. Donella had to remain silent to avoid revealing her hiding place.

Bobbie loved to hide Donella's kittens in the ash collector beneath their fireplace. Donella would hear her kittens' meowing but could not find their location. This made Donella very furious.

When Bobbie was about five years old, he was hitting Boyd and Gilbert in the stomach with a ball. Edgar was laughing. Boyd and Gilbert thought that it wasn't funny and that Bobbie should be made to stop. So Bobbie threw the ball really hard and hit Edgar in the stomach and got into real trouble. It was no longer funny to Edgar.

Victor Rogers (Marcella's brother) took Jean and Bobbie to the J. R. Ayers sheep ranch overlooking the Wallula Gap south of Hoover to pick out orphaned lambs. When grown, the lambs would be returned to the sheep ranch. Their tameness from being with children would help make them valuable leaders of the sheep band.

One morning one of the lambs was found bloated with its feet pointing upwards toward the sky. Bobbie said that he was thankful and relieved that it was Jean's lamb that had died, and not his.

One time Edgar and a hired man were burning weeds in the pasture. They warned Bobbie to stay away from the fire. After the fire was out Bobbie began stomping through the ashes. His feet became very hot


and he began crying. The hired man carried Bobbie to the house and Marcella soaked his feet in cold water. Some lessons are painfully learned.

When Bobbie was about seven years old, Edgar told him that if he helped clean up the yard, they could burn the trash in a bonfire. Bobbie gathered tumbleweeds, sticks, dead branches, papers, and other trash until there was a large pile of combustibles. Edgar told Bobbie that he wanted to be present when the trash was burned.

Bobbie was so excited and anxious about the bonfire that he struck a match and started the pile burning before Edgar even knew what was happening. When Edgar saw the flames leaping against the painted redwood siding of the house, he became terrified. He realized that the pile of trash was too close to their home. He spanked Bobbie, sent him away, and then proceeded to extinguish the fire with a shovel and garden hose. That was the only time that Edgar gave Bobbie a really severe spanking.

Bobby and Donella used to sit on the back of Bossy, their milk cow, while she was eating oats with her head locked in the stanchion. One time when Donella was sitting on Bossy, Bobby turned Bossy loose. Bossy went running out of the barn with Donella hanging on for dear life. Eventually Donella was bucked off and harbored angry feelings toward Bobby.

One winter Ernest and Thelma Cowles from Grandview visited Edgar's family. Ernest had made Bobbie a pretty silver ring with a petrified wood setting. Bobbie was very excited about being presented with his beautiful new ring. When the Cowles were walking to their car pushing Glennie in his wheel chair, Bobbie tried to show off by throwing a snow ball he formed from the freshly fallen snow. The snowball hit Ernest on the side of his head. Bobbie felt very embarrassed and sorry that he had thrown the snowball.

One time Edgar, Marcella, and family were visiting Marcella's sister's family, the Skramstaads, in Moscow, Idaho. Edgar, Lloyd Skramstaad, and Grant, Edgar's youngest son, went into town for groceries. Edgar


and Lloyd returned to the farm house. Later, a telephone call was received from the Moscow Police Station indicating that they had a lost boy at the station. Edgar and Lloyd suddenly realized that Grant did not return with them. They hurried to the Police Station where they found Grant eating an ice cream cone. Grant began crying, frightened and angry with them. He said, "Why did you leave me." All were quite upset.

Donella used an unusual tactic to improve Grant's behavior. She made paper Gremlin cutouts and pinned these onto the living room and dining room curtains. She told him that these Gremlins were watching him and if he did anything wrong they would seek revenge. Grant believed her. He avoided those rooms to the extent that Donella felt a little guilty about what she had done.

Edgar bought a new outboard boat. Bobbie was anxious to test it and insisted on taking it to the river, even though it was getting dark. Edgar, Bobbie, and a young couple who rented Edgar's apartment launched the boat in the Finley Lagoon and proceeded to make some turns. The bow hooked in a wave, unseen in the darkness, that caused the boat to overturn. Edgar and Bobbie swam pushing the overturned boat to shore. Everyone safely swam to shore. The only thing they lost was a pair of boots. It frightened me because that river is deep with many currents. Many people have drowned there. Edgar was so proud that he had saved his hat.

Edgar bought a motorized dirt bike for Grant. Edgar told Grant never to ride it on main roads. But Grant decided to try it anyway. The police picked him up and made him push the bike all the way home. Part of it was up a steep hill, and he didn't get any sympathy from anyone, especially from his father.

It may have been a little hard on Edgar to have his own sons, daughters, and lots of nieces and nephews in his classes at school. I think he may have been a little extra harder on Jean, Bob, Donella, and Grant, because he did not want other parents to think that he played favorites. Gilbert and Bonnie learned more in his classes than in any other classes.


Jean saved enough money to buy a Model A Ford Coupe. It had a folding rumble seat. She was very proud of her automobile. Jean and Bonnie had a ball running all over in it. One Saturday night they were having fun riding around Kennewick and Pasco. Jean would retard the spark and make the muffler pop and crack, especially when going by the Highland Grange at night while they were holding a dance. She also blew the muffler that night which shortened their fun as they were afraid they would be stopped for a defective muffler. The next day Jean had to buy a new muffler and she and Bonnie had to install it. They didn't know how, but managed to get it on anyway. It turned out that they did a good job.

Jean was a very sweet girl. When she married Curley Marsh and moved to the Boise Valley we all missed her very much. Grant was very cute. He would wear a big hat and wore play guns that he drew on everyone. He later played and enjoyed football.

Bobbie had a talent for playing the piano. He wrote some beautiful words and set them to music. I wanted him to send them in to someone who knew music. It was so pretty. I don't know if he still plays or not or if he sent his song in.

Donella loved poetry. When she stayed with Aunt Bertha, she and Sis would write poetry together. Bertha wanted Donella to have her book of poems. But after she passed away, we couldn't find it anyplace. Ed couldn't or wouldn't say what had happened to it. Bonita and Bertha were interested in coins. Bonita was supposed to get Bertha's coins when she was finished with them. But most of the good ones were missing.

Bonnie's husband, Paul, when he had the Atlantic Richfield service station on West Kennewick Avenue near Olympia Street, would get very unusual coins and send them to Bertha. They were missing from her collection. Sis knew a man who collected coins and stamps. They traded back and forth. Bertha was very ill with cancer before she passed away. She might have sold some to him. Bonnie spent a lot of time visiting Bertha and Veva. She and Roberta were close cousins of about the same age.


Edgar used to lament because he didn't have any grandchildren, while all the rest of his brothers and sisters did. But he ended up with 17, more than all of the rest of us put together.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

ROCK HOUNDING

One Sunday afternoon we were watching a baseball game and Guy stopped and wanted us to go arrow head hunting. We didn't really want to go, but decided to go. I found two perfect arrow heads laying on the surface of the ground. That started us as rock hunters. Our group included Guy, Marie and their family; Leonard and I with Gilbert and Bonnie; and lots of times Edgar.

Edgar always kidded Guy when we were hunting rocks. Edgar said that when he picked up a rock and showed it to Guy, Guy would lick it and say it wasn't any good. But when Guy picked one up and licked it, it was always good. I was always afraid Guy would cut his tongue off, because the edges of the petrified wood were so sharp.

Guy, Marie, Edgar, Leonard and I took a doctor from one of the museums back east to Snake Island. The doctor was pretty drunk, and Guy let the boat get down into the rapids. The doctor and Marie neither one could swim. The doctor was shaking so hard that water was coming over the sides into the boat. Guy scolded Marie for not sitting still. We finally got close enough to shore for Marie and me to get out. Guy was so disgusted with us. He said, "If you girls had waited, I could have landed without your getting wet." Marie and I just howled as we both had been sitting in water up to our waist.

Whenever Leonard would have a day off, we would pack up food, the kids and go to Plymouth to hunt arrow heads. Bonnie would hunt really hard and Gilbert would play. Then when it came time to go home, Gilbert would cry because he hadn't found any. Then he would generally find one and make Bonnie so mad.

I used to be so unhappy with Gilbert. He had a BB gun and when he would hit a rabbit, Bonnie would cry. He shot down the hill one day with the rest of us walking behind him. The pellet hit a rock, came back


and hit Leonard in the eye. Leonard had a very sore eye. Gilbert felt terrible, even though it was not his fault.

We found lots of Indian artifacts, especially Guy. He began building and developing a beautiful museum. It finally became very difficult to find Indian artifacts because the islands where we hunted were flooded by backwaters from new dams. We started hunting and digging rocks instead. Petrified wood, agates, geodes, thunder eggs, nodules, tearlites, and petrified sage brush.

Later Veva and Leslie Lamb joined us. After Leslie and Veva became interested in rock hounding, they and their daughters, Marion Joyce and Roberta Mae, joined us every chance they had. We had so many good trips together. Although Veva had severe arthritis in her knees, she still loved the trips.

Marie and I had lots of fun together. We always went on all the rock hunting trips when we could take the children. Even after Marie became ill, she would take some oranges and apples and something to read. How the food disappeared, dirt and all. Even sand tastes good when you are hungry. Those were wonderful times to remember. Veva and I would look for agates within sight of Marie. When we became tired, we returned to the car to talk up a storm with Marie.

Marie went rock hounding with us until she became too ill to make the trips. I used to call Marie every day after her illness increased to where she could no longer leave the house to travel with Guy. After she was taken to the hospital, we took turns staying up with her. Guy and I took the midnight shift. We all missed her so much. She died so young.

Guy continued his trips with his children, relatives, and cronies. He eventually developed a lovely museum with his bountiful collections. He made trips to Alaska to visit Alma and Naulon in Fairbanks. He always came home loaded with artifacts, ivory, and beautiful jewelry to add to the museum.

We made a lot of trips and after Gilbert and Bonnie were married. The grandchildren went with us. Bonnie and Barrie enjoyed these outings.


We made a trip to Graveyard Point near Boise, Idaho. Bonnie, Barrie and I started up a hill. Barrie screamed, "Snake Grandma!" The rattlesnake was coiled and ready to strike. I really ran. Barrie afterward said he did not know Grandma could run so fast. I just hate snakes.
Paul did not like rock hunting and was very busy, but he was good to let Bonnie and Barrie come with us. Gilbert was a fishing man and took his kids with him most of the time. We went agate hunting in Bickleton one day. I told Danny to stay close to us as he could get lost and there were range cattle there. Pretty soon I heard him yell, "Bull, Grandma!" I said "Run!" Away we ran and hid behind some stumps. Pretty soon an old worn-out cow came out from behind the bushes. Grandpa just cracked up with laughter.

We made one trip to Montana to dig sapphires with Helen and Leslie, their son Kevin, and their small dog. Bonnie and Barrie and their large dog Sandy also went. It rained on us the first day and when we arrived in Montana it was too wet to dig sapphires. We drove on to some fields and mountain ranges. The owner knew Leslie and opened up his ranch to us. The sun was shinning and we spent several days there. We found some beautiful agates. Leonard found one big beautiful piece of petrified wood, but it was too heavy for him to carry. When we returned to camp, there it was. Barrie had carried it down for his grandpa.

We went through a museum at Helena. It was very interesting. The Lord's supper was presented with such realism that you could almost see the Disciples talking. These are precious memories.

One week end stands out in my mind as a really fun time. Danny was in the boy scouts and wanted to show us how the boy scouts build a fire and prepare breakfast. So Gilbert, Elaine, Danny, Dale, Dana, Leonard, and I went to Ferndale, Idaho to screen garnets. Gilbert, Elaine, and Danny slept in a tent. The rest of us slept in our trailer. The weather had been so pretty, but the next morning was very foggy and everything was wet. Danny got up early and tried to start a fire. The wood was too wet. He had to give up. We all ended up in the trailer house taking turns eating breakfast. We had so much fun. The weekend turned out to be beautiful.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
User avatar
tristanbgilb
Posts: 908
Joined: Tue Sep 01, 2020 9:20 pm
Contact:

Re: www.MethowValley.org

Post by tristanbgilb »

GUY'S FAMILY

Alma and I would woak across the railroad bridge at night and have Leonard take us to a Chinese restaurant in Pasco for lunch at midnight. We would then walk home again. It was sort of scary and I would not think of anyone else doing it now. Crossing one this railroad bridge was the only thing I ever say my little Mama gave up on. She had walked to about the middle of the bridge and froze. Edgar had to carry her back, because whe could not move. We all prayed that a train would not come each time we walked on it.

To celebrateone Thanksgiving, Guy's family and my family went to Sunnyside to be with Edgar. Edgar was teaching in the Sunnyside School District. Guy's daughter, Shirley, and Bonita were just 28 days apart in age. Dorothy came up to me and said, "Auntie Elma, I just Hate you!" I felt shocked and said, "Why? What have I done, Dorothy?" Dorothy said, "Bonnie is so happy and cooing and laughing, while Shirley is starving to death!"

I had so much milk and Marie could not nurse Shirley at all. I told Dorothy that I would just love to nurse Shirley. She ran and told Marie. Marie said she would be so grateful if I would. I nursed her until she could eat from a spoon and drink from a cup. She knew when it was time for her to come to our house for her to eat, even as tiny as she was. After getting her little tummy full, she wouldn't stay with me at all. She wanted her Mommy and Papa.

One day I had painted all day in the kitchen. It looked very nice and clean and made me feel very proud. Leonard and I were going over to Auntie Keene's to play Pinochle. Dorothy had come down to stay all night. We told the kids not to get the paint dirty. When we came home, black marks were all over the wall on the south side. Dorothy had been showing Gilbert and Bonnie how she could stand on her head and balance herself with her feet against the wall. I could have easily


paddled all three of them. But they did feel really terrible. Mothers are softies.

Dorothy told Uncle Leonard one day that she could run faster than he could. So he gave her a head start, about a third of the way to the mail box, and passed her so easily that she could hardly believe it.

Guy had an old horse that we all loved. One day he was making rows for the irrigation water to run in the corn. The horse just stopped and refused to move. Guy lost his temper and really hit her. Still, she refused to move. Finally he went in front of her and at her feet was Shirley, just a crawling baby. Guy felt so bad to think that his horse took a bad beating rather than to step on the baby.

Guy and I took Gilbert, Bonnie, Leslie, and Alma swimming on the Pasco side of the Snake River. The bank was sloping gradually down to the water and it was a good place to swim. There we met a baby sitter with Dr. Blackman's nurse's twin girls. They were swimming together when one of the twins started screaming that she couldn't find her sister. We all started searching for her. One of the swimmers stepped on her. She was being held on the bottom by a freak current. Guy grabbed her, put her on her stomach, and he and I started working on her. She started to spit up water and coughing. Two firemen arrived and pushed Guy and me away. They turned her on her back and couldn't get their pulmonator started. She was lost. We were all broken hearted. It haunted me for months. We never went swimming there again. I just couldn't go back. I can still visualize her darling little face.

Gilbert and his cousin Boyd were great pals and what one couldn't think of, the other one did. To this day Gilbert tells me things they did that makes my hair a little greyer. Bonnie and her cousin Shirley tried to keep up with the boys and nearly killed themselves. But I still say kids and farms go together.

We used to have lots of family dinners together. Gilbert always said Aunt Marie made the best cakes of us all and that Boyd made the best potato soup. The children would finish first and go out to play. The grownups would visit. One day while visiting, we heard a car stop


really fast. A man marched into the house holding Gilbert by one ear and Boyd by one ear. He asked, "Do you punish these kids or do I?" I asked, "What did they do?" He said they threw tires in front of his car and nearly frightened him to death, as he thought he had hit a child. We promised him that they would be punished. We did not let them play together anymore that day and they had to go to bed early.

One day feeling like the kids were up to something, I found Boyd and Gilbert riding their bicycles on top the roof of one of the chicken houses. One day Boyd fell and rammed a stick down into his throat. He came running to the house with blood streaming from his mouth. I had a time finding out what had happened. It wasn't so bad after the blood was washed out. Life was never dull, especially when the kids got together.

One time Gilbert and Boyd made candy. Bonnie told them it was not yet cooked long enough. The boys told Bonnie to shut up, they knew how to make candy. Boyd grabbed the candy and ran out doors with Gilbert running after him. By the time Gilbert caught up with him, it was nearly gone and they had to eat the remaining candy with a spoon. Bonnie nearly had hysterics laughing over the outcome.

I had a big ceramic dog bank that was won in a carnival. I had it almost full of Indian pennies. Boyd and Gilbert broke it open and spent all of my pennies on candy and gum. I could have cried, but didn't. But it wasn't funny. I wish I had them today. Gilbert and Boyd tried smoking and caught the manure pile on fire. It smoldered for days. Edgar's oldest daughter, Jean, got into a lot of fun and mischief with them.

Alma told me that when Leslie Gilbert played football, he was very good and received a college scholarship, but did not use it.
www.TristanGilbert.com

Image <=NUCLEAR BUTTONImage

Image

RADIO
Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests