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tristanbgilb
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GROWING UP

When Edgar got his first new suit with long pants, he was very proud of them. Mama told him not to ride his bicycle in his new suit. But Edgar was so anxious to go for a ride that he forgot to change. He went for a ride, ran into a barbed wire fence, and tore his new suit. Mama felt really bad and patched the new suit so that the damages did not show very much. Edgar felt real bad.

Edgar was always very good to me. He would take me to parties and wait outside, because Papa would not let me go alone. We spent lots of time together. Veva was so much older than we were that she no longer enjoyed much of our childish play and we were not able to spend much time with her. Edgar got angry with Veva one day. After we had gone to bed, he took me out and spanked me. The spanking was intended for Veva, but Veva and I had changed sides in the bed. Edgar felt really bad when he discovered his mistake.

Don't ever let your brother teach you how to ice skate! Edgar was very patient with me in most things, but not ice skating. He felt he was wasting good skating time in teaching a baby sister. But one of the boys in my grade taught me. We had so much fun cracking the whip on ice. I was generally at the end.

A boy I went to school with came to our home and invited me to join him in ice skating. Mama wouldn't let me go, and I thought I was really being deprived. But a short time later he returned. He had broken through the ice and was sure wet and cold. I was very happy Mama had made me stay at home. My little Mama was very wise.

Older children in grade school loved to tease me about my long curls. The bell tower in the Bell School was home to many bats that came down out of the tower at night. The bats not only flew around the school yard, but also flew into the school house on evenings when the


door and windows were open during evening programs. I was told that bats would fly onto my head, crawl into my curls, and tear my hair out. To this day I still have a fear of bats.

My parents attended school only through the fourth grade. Mama advanced her education by studying along with us. Papa always seemed to know the answers to our math problems without doing any figuring. He seemed to be very intelligent even though he had not attended school beyond the fourth grade.

When I was in the first grades of school, all the children took time out from doing school work to learn to knit. We knitted sweaters for our boys in World War I.

Bertha was very good to Edgar and me. She was a mother and a sister both to me and to Edgar. One of my teachers, Marion, was a very good looking young lady. She took a liking to me and shared candy and flowers with me that she received from her boy friend. One day she became angry with me about something and gave me failing grades on my report card. Bertha took one look at my report card, marched up to the school house, and showed my other report cards with grades in the 90's to Mr. Starling, the principal. Mr. Starling told Bertha he would take care of it. When confronted by Mr. Starling, Marion cried and said she was so sorry. She made everything right on my grades. I still loved her. She sent me greeting cards and photos of her family after she was married.

When I was in the fourth grade, we were given shots for Scarlet Fever. Our principal, Gus Schlaugh, lived with Bertha and Ed. He teased me a lot. I sure thought he was great. I was terrified while we were getting ready and waiting for the shots at school. I asked, "Gus, do I really had to have the shots?" Gus angrily told me, in front of the class, "Never call me Gus. You must call me Mister Schlaugh, and nothing else."

I never liked him again after he reprimanded me for calling him Gus. He later told me how sorry he was and he told Bertha that he had made a serious mistake by saying what he had said to me in front of the class.


I was in high school before I could forgive him. Even then things were never as they had been before.

One day Edgar and I were walking home at noon for lunch and Edgar got stung by a yellow jacket. I laughed. Edgar said, "I hope you get stung going back to school." I was stung twice. During class I went up the school teacher and told her I did not feel well. She took one look at me and said, "Elma, you are broken all out in hives. Go home and have your mother put you in a soda bath." I was so feverish and so sick, but I had a date to go to my girlfriend's party. I got out of bed and started for the kitchen. I fainted and fell on the floor. When I awakened, Veva had poured a whole bucket of cold water on me. Edgar felt very sorry for me and guilty. That helped some.

One night, real late, someone beat on the front door. Veva and I were afraid, but I opened it to see who was there. There stood an Indian covered with blood. He and his wife had hit the pole that was in the center of the street with his car. He asked to use our telephone. We were very frightened and tried to explain to him that we did not have a telephone. Finally he left. Whenever a blizzard hit, the teachers would send us home. Edgar and I had to hurry home to get in kindling, wood, and coal. We had to work fast, and bring in a lot of it. Fierce blizzards often lasted up to three days. Lots of mornings we got out of bed and found snow on the floor.

Before we left Latah, we lived in a house that was quite roomy. Mama, Veva, and I slept in a large bedroom that had a walk-in closet. Papa and Edgar slept in a smaller bedroom. The house had a parlor, dining room, kitchen, a pantry built under the stairway, a hall way, and a wash room built onto the house. Even though Veva and I knew the pantry had to be cleaned out every Saturday, we still put little dabs of food away. Then on Saturday, we had to clear out every dish and clear each shelf. Kids never learn!

To go to the outhouse, we had to go down a walkway, turn, and then go down another walkway. Winters in Latah were very severe. When we had blizzards, we would get out of bed and step into snow, so cold, and then walk through the cold to the outhouse. The seats were covered


with snow. The catalogues we used for paper were wet and snowy. Sometimes we used newspapers such as the Cappers Weekly which we received monthly. It had very interesting continued stories. We could hardly wait for the next issue to read about what happened next. We even found snow on the floor. Papa was so cold all the time. The down stairs were always warm.

We had prayer meetings in groves of trees. They would last so long that I would go to sleep on a bench. Children were spread around on benches, dirty, tired, and sleeping. Papa kept me awake as long as he could. During one camp meeting, the director chose a new song. The folks couldn't remember the words, so I hummed the tune. They were all very surprised.

My parents were peculiar in some ways. We were not allowed to play Pinochle on Sunday, but we could play Rook and Pit, which was a wild game. We were not allowed to square dance, but we could play the "Virginia Reel" which is similar to square dancing. We were not allowed to play any kind of game, such as tennis, baseball, or basketball on Sundays. We survived, so I guess it was all right. Our neighbors, Mabel and Maxine, were not restricted from playing these games on Sunday.

We had lots of fun growing up at Latah in the summer time. We took numerous walks, picked many beautiful wild flowers, and went on wonderful picnics. In the winter we coasted, skated, and went on sleigh rides. We could ice skate seven miles to Tekoa and come back by train for 10 cents. We would start coasting at the school house, come clear down the hill to the main street, turn right toward the depot, then cut up over the hill and be ready to start again. So many turned out to coast, including grownups and even the teachers. The next day we would find a penny or nickel where people had been sliding down the hill, belly buster.
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GRANDFATHERS

Grandpa Gilbert had a wandering foot. Every time the family would get settled, begin to prosper, and have plenty to eat, he would go some place else. That is why Papa was in the gold mines in California when Phi died of diphtheria. When Grandpa Gilbert was in the gold mines, he found a gold nugget that he had fashioned into a broach for Grandma. It is very pretty. My sister Veva has it now. That nugget was about all they found in the gold mines.

Edgar and I never saw either of our Grandpas. Both my Grandfathers, Grandpa Gilbert and Grandpa Tozier died before I was born. My older sister Veva shared many stories about my Grandfathers. She told me she sat on their laps while being told many wonderful stories. I always regretted that my older sister Veva had known her Grandfathers and had loved them so much, but I was not able to know them and could learn about them only through Veva's stories. My great Grandpa Tozier fought in the Civil War and developed severe rheumatism from taking cover from the enemy and sleeping in wet trenches. This caused him to die quite young. Veva said that he was a very sweet person.
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RETURN TO LATAH

When I was about six years old, Mama decided to return to Latah. I felt rather sad at leaving our homestead, but it was too hard on Mama.
Daddy wouldn't permit Edgar and me to bring our arrow heads as we were so crowded for room. I cried because I had a whole coffee can full of perfect ones. I think it is so strange that I can't remember the trip home (only about having to leave our arrowheads), but I can remember all of our trips going to Dubois. Maybe I was in shock. We must have come home by train. Veva couldn't help me to remember. She also didn't remember.

Mama bought Ed and Bertha's house located near the bank in Latah. Mama worked at any job she could get. Mama took in washing and ironing, and worked in the Latah Hotel. She would sort peas all day and wash and iron for others at night. She cooked in a cook shack during harvest and also sewed and took care of sick people. There was no one who could equal my Mama. She worked so hard and always had time for us kids. Any work that was honest she would do, but she would never accept any charity. As I look back, I cannot believe Mama did all the work she had to do. The Lord really gave her extra strength. She was such a wonderful Christian and had so much faith.

We always had enough to eat and always gave our tithe to the church. We had a cow and a garden which helped. We also had chickens and rabbits. One time Mama had saved money for a new dress, but instead gave it to the church as part of our tithe. We wondered why she did that and if we would have enough money for food. The next morning there was a quarter of a beef left on our back porch. Our wonderful Lord provided the food that we needed.


GREAT-GRANDFATHER AND GREAT-GRANDMOTHER TOZIER

Mama had only one little sister, Effie. Effie passed away when she was very young and when Mama was only four years old. Mama's mother died also when Mama was only four years old. Mama wanted a little brother or sister and was brokenhearted when Effie died.

Great-Grandfather and Great-Grandmother Tozier raised Mama. They also took in a little child named Minnie who did not have any parents. I remember Aunt Minnie. She always felt so much better off than the rest of us, because she married a doctor. I liked her husband much better than I liked her.

Mama felt that she made a mistake when she ran away with Papa and married him when she was only 15 years old. She wanted to marry Edgar, but Great Grandfather and Great Grandma Tozier insisted that she wait until she was older. They had been very good to Mama and raised her from the time she was only four years old. Mama was very young when she married Papa, but she seemed older than she really was. She had been a good helper to Great Grandfather and Great Grandma Tozier.

My Great Grandma (Anna Mae Tozier) lived in Rockford, Washington before she came to stay with us in Latah. Edgar and I loved to go on the train to visit her. The one-way fare cost 25 cents for children less than 12 years of age and 50 cents for adults. Edgar was so large for his age that the conductor would not believe him or Mama when they explained that he was not yet 12 years old.

My Great Grandma (Anna Mae Tozier) lived with us for several years. She would tell Edgar and me such wonderful stories. Great Grandma Tozier used to tell us that while crossing the plains they would put the milk in buckets and hang them up. When evening came they would have butter all churned from the milk going back and forth from the movement of the wagons. When they would meet a circuit preacher, they would have wonderful revival meetings and bring out their best food. They used juice from the pies for communion.


The Civil War was before my time and the little I heard about it was from my Great Grandma Tozier. She told about Grandpa going to war with thoughts of winning the war very soon and coming back home, but when he came home he was a very sick man. He had spent so many days and nights in wet trenches, that he had developed inflammatory rheumatism. He died within a few years, after suffering very badly most of the time.

It was a tragic war, brothers against brothers, and fathers against sons. It tore our nation apart. Beautiful homes and plantations were entirely wiped out. People were forced to suffer from starvation and exposure to bad weather. The became discouraged, ragged, and experienced much suffering. There was little or no hope left for the future, faced with loved ones dead, crippled, and dying. Some of them took heart and restarted their lives again. Some families stayed together, but many were never rejoined.

I always hated to have my teeth pulled, and I hated for Papa to look into my mouth. I had a front one so loose that it was just hanging. Papa told me that if I did not pull it before I went back to school, he would pull it. Great Grandma, Anna Mae Tozier, told me she would give me 25 cents if I pulled my tooth. So I would not get in trouble. I finally went outside and pulled it.

Great Grandma Tozier could tat so beautifully. Tatting is somewhat like crocheting, but it is done with a shuttle instead of a hook. Doilies, brassiere covering, table runners, and bedspreads were made by tatting. Tatting is more complicated that knitting or crocheting. Bonnie still has Bertha's shuttle. I can still do some tatting, but I can't draw the thread up into flowers like it is supposed to be done. It is a very dainty and almost forgotten art, but it is gradually coming back.

I learned to knit in grade school. We spent many hours at a time knitting sweaters that were like vests for our military boys to keep their chests warm. We felt so good about it as we knew we were helping the war in our own small way.


Great Grandma Tozier made each one of us a tatted doily. She finished mine just before she died. And how I missed her after she was gone.
She kept all of her things in the parlor where I would dress and undress with her. When she got pneumonia and passed away, it nearly broke my heart. I grieved and cried so hard the day of the funeral that I couldn't eat. I was extremely offended because others ate. My girl friends all loved her too. She was a wonderful Christian woman.
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HOMESTEADING IN DUBOIS

When I was five years old, Father, Uncle Carol (my Papa's brother), Guy (my older brother), and their families decided to homestead in Southern Idaho, near Dubois. The men went first to build shelters for us and the rest of our family who were coming later. I'll never forget that trip. All of us were loaded down, each with something to be responsible for. It was a hard trip for all of us, with the wait overs and all, but the worst was yet to come.

When we first arrived at Dubois, we were surprised that Father wasn't there to meet us, just Uncle Carol. It was so cold we nearly froze and Uncle Carol kept putting Mama's questions off. We all knew something was wrong. He kept singing, "It's a Long Way to Tipperary." To this day when I hear that song I think of that long, cold trip in a long wagon bed covered with lots of blankets and hot rocks, and still freezing.
When we arrived, we found that Papa had suffered a stroke and his left side was completely paralyzed, all except his heart. It nearly broke our hearts to see Papa like that.

Leslie Nendell and Alma Marie were born to my brother Guy and his wife Marie in Latah before we moved to Dubois. Their third child, Gene, was born after they moved with us to Dubois. We all thought Gene was so wonderful. Edgar and I would take our little red wagon to Guy's and pick up the dirty clothes and Mama would wash them nice and clean; then we would return the cleaned clothes to Guy and Marie.

Edgar and I had lots of fun at the homestead. We hunted arrow heads and found Indian pipes, mortars, pestles, hunting knives, war clubs, spears (sometimes with handles), axes, and scrapers scattered all over the surface of the ground, and often around old camp fire sites.

I was so bashful that I made my own life a misery. One day Father took the team and drove us about three miles to our nearest neighbor's home. After we got there, he said that we would stay for dinner. Our neighbors had two boys who teased me until I ran away.


I started for home, only in the wrong direction. I kept walking until I came to some Indian wigwams and could hear jabbering. I started running. I ran until I finally came to Guy's place and recognized where I was. I think that if the folks had not been so worried and I so frightened, I would have gotten a good spanking. However, Mama just loved me and fed me. I was completely worn out, and so dirty and hot.

Our cow was so gentle that Edgar would milk one side while at the same time I milked the other side. We rode horseback after the cows. We had a horse that was very gentle and we loved her dearly, but one day she ate loco weed and had to be shot. We cried and cried.

We ate lots of wild rabbits and squirrels. I would eat rabbit, but not squirrel. Edgar and I would chase wild baby rabbits until we were exhausted. And when we would take them home, Mama would tell us to turn them loose, or they would die. When they died, we would conduct a funeral for them.

One day while we were outside, we saw my brother Guy running into our cabin with a gun. Papa called us into the cabin and told us not to go outside. While looking out of the window we saw a rabid coyote running in a straight line and foaming at the mouth.

Papa fell one day, just in front of a rattlesnake. Several of us small children were with him when he fell. A neighbor killed the snake, just as it began to coil to strike at Papa. It really was a miracle that we were never bitten by a rattlesnake. There were many snakes in this region.
Another fearful creature was the tick. They were also very plentiful. One became lodged in my ear. Papa had to dig it out. It seemed like it took a long time for me to completely heal from that tick bite.

The trips to Dubois from the homestead were the highlights of our lives as it took all day to go by buggy. We started early in the morning, but didn't arrive until late at night. We had to ford deep waters. We were followed by range cattle that attempted to fight the horses. The Gypsies and the Indians would try to race or trade horses with us and became quite angry when Father refused. We always got candy on these trips and something special to eat, though we didn't get to go very often.


Uncle Carol's family always bought a lot of mustard and just piled it on their bread.

Veva did not move with us to Idaho when I went with Mama and Edgar. She stayed with Bertha to finish her school year. We were so excited when she was coming to visit us, as we had so missed her. She was 16 and very pretty. There were two bachelors in our neighborhood that could hardly wait until she arrived. But Veva did not care for them, except as friends.

Our cabin wasn't very big, but Mama made a home out of it. We had one bedroom located in the loft. Papa slept in the loft. One day while Papa and I were sleeping in the loft, some company came and visited with Mama and the other children in the living room. I had an accident and wet the bed. I was afraid that Papa would be very angry with me. Instead, Papa was very sweet and understanding about it.

Mama had to work so very hard doing the work of a man along with her own work. The one thing Edgar and I didn't like to do was grub sage brush. The only wood we had to burn was sagebrush and it took a lot of it. The sage brush was so high, one had to be on a horse to see over it. We used a shovel to dig the sage, and a saw and an axe to cut it into stove lengths. We loaded the sage into our little wagon and pulled it home. We also gathered buffalo chips for fuel, but never saw any buffalo.

Often we would hide under the manger in the barn when we were called to grub sage brush. Guy never did find our hiding place. I am ashamed of this now when I think how hard everyone had to work.

If we would or could have stayed on our homestead, we would have made money from its appreciation. Guy, Leslie, and Leslie's wife, Helen, went back many years later and found the land to be under cultivation. Many artesian wells had been developed to water wonderful crops, and there were many lovely homes. But no way could we have stayed. Mama was working way beyond her physical and emotional strength and endurance, and so was Guy.
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JOURNEY OF JOY
ELMA JOY GILBERT WAGENAAR


BEGINNING IN LATAH

I was born March 4, 1908, in Latah, a very small farming town with a population of approximately 200 persons in the eastern part of Washington State. Latah had a bank, a hotel, a grocery store, and a general store that included a post office.

My parents were Edgar Rollen and Anna Mae (Tozier) Gilbert. They loved to sing. Papa had a beautiful tenor voice; Mama sang alto. Papa was tall, one inch shorter than six feet, very slender, and very handsome. He was raised by his grandparents. My Grandma Gilbert had four big boys and two girls. When they got into trouble, she wouldn't try to catch them. She would wait until they were in bed and asleep. Then she would take a stick and really use it. She was the boss of the family.

At age 36 Grandma Gilbert went through the menopause. She thought she was pregnant. She left Grandpa and moved into Spokane. When she found the cause of her illness, she came back home and had to make things right with Grandpa. My Grandpa Gilbert had an itchy foot. He loved to travel and work in the gold mines.

My mother was raised by her great grandparents, as her mother died when she was only four years old. Through her married life she carried a secret of which she was ashamed. She never told this secret to her children, including me. I found out about it because her oldest son, Guy, told his daughter Shirley, who told my nephew, Bob Gilbert, the writer of these memoirs. When she was only fifteen, my father, Edgar wanted to marry her. Her father and great-grandparents told her she


was too young. Edgar persuaded her to go with him to Rathdrum, Idaho to get married, without permission from her father or great- grandparents.

Her grandfather Tozier was French; her grandmother was Scottish. Her father was a fearsome looking Frenchman. His body was covered with black curly hair. Some said he resembled a black bear. When Anna's father found out she had left to get married, he was furious. He hurried to Rathdrum, Idaho to stop the wedding, but he was too late. After considering the situation, he reluctantly, but graciously, accepted Edgar as his new son-in-law.

I was the youngest of seven children. Mama was shorter than her daughters, being only two inches taller than five feet, and tended to be a little chubby. She had brown hair and brown eyes. My sister Bertha was the only child with brown eyes. My oldest brother Phi was like Mama's right hand. He helped her with everything. We lived in the Stringtown area, about eight miles north of Latah, where we grew peaches and apples in our orchard. Mama often remained home, caring for three small children, while Papa was away singing in the church choir. During these periods, Mama was occasionally frightened by Nez Perce Indians peering through the windows into our home. They did not speak English, but gestured for food.

When Phi was 13 years old, he and my two sisters, Edna and Bertha, all contracted diphtheria. Phi refused to go to bed and failed to get adequate rest because he was too busy helping Mama care for Edna and Bertha. At that time many people contracted diphtheria. We also lost two cousins during this period when Phi passed away.

My Father was in the gold mines at the time, far from home. Word didn't even reach him in time for him to come home for the funeral. Mama was all alone and had to bury Phi by herself. My mother and father never completely recovered from their loss of Phi. Because of their grief, they left the orchard, our home, and their memories, in Stringtown. Had it not been for their sincere Christian faith, I'm sure they could not have accepted this loss. We moved into Latah and lived in a house near the Bell School.


Next was my sister, Edna Reta, who had beautiful long hair that was admired by everyone. She began suffering severe headaches. Her doctor told her that the weight of her hair was the cause of her headaches. Everyone felt very sorry when Edna's beautiful long hair was sheared.

Edna started her career as a nurse. She became so fond of her patients that she suffered severe grief when one of them would pass away. Her doctor advised her to terminate her nursing career.

Edna married Francis Drake, a Methodist Minister who was widower with two children, Harold and Mildred. They had one child of their own, Edna Mae, a year before I was born.

My next eldest sister, Bertha Evangeline, married Ed Pittman while I was a small baby. They lived on a hill near the Latah cemetery between Stringtown and Latah. During one occasion Bertha became so lonesome for her family that she walked to Stringtown and pulled me back to her home in a small wagon. Ed frequently embarrassed me by telling about the time he was holding me and I wet on him. Shortly after, my brother, Guy Carrol, married Marie Nendell. Three children, Veva Mae, Edgar Ross, and myself, Elma Joy, were left at home.

When Mama was pregnant with Edgar and the time came for his delivery, Veva was sent to the neighbors to play. She was told that there would be a big surprise for her when she returned. She thought that she was going to receive a doll. When they showed her Edgar, she screamed and cried that she wanted them to send him back. Veva was probably in severe shock when I came along. When Edgar and Veva became angry with me, they would tell me, "You were not wanted anyway!" I would go crying to Mama and she would comfort me and make me feel better.

When Edgar was small, he was very frightened of a man with white hair and a white beard. Edgar would run and hide until the man was out of sight. Mama wondered why he did this. While I stood at the window and watched the man that caused Edgar to be so fearful walk by, Edgar tried to coax me into hiding with him.


When I was very little, I thought God and Jesus were different. I thought God was stern and forbidding, while Jesus was gentle and kind. I was the youngest of the children who played in my neighborhood.
There was a very mean man on one of the streets. He had a row of beautiful Lilacs that were in full bloom. When the children reached up to pick some, this man came storming out of his house swinging his cane. I was so frightened that all I could do was say, "Oh God, please help me," and God did. After that experience I knew there was a wonderful kind Heavenly Father that takes care of us.

I remember very little about my Papa during my early childhood in Latah. I do remember a few little incidents, such as being taken for a ride in the horse-driven buggy out in the country. I remember going with him to collect fire wood and his telling me about different birds and his garden. Papa always grew a big garden and brought in some of the largest watermelons. I can vividly recall one Christmas during which he retrieved a doll from a Christmas tree for me, because I was too shy to get it for myself.

I have fond memories of playing in Father's harness shop back in Latah with my older brother Edgar. When Mama couldn't take us with her, we stayed with Papa in his harness shop. He gave us little pieces of leather to play with. He made beautiful harnesses and repaired shoes. My Papa enjoyed his work. He was very athletic and delighted the children by turning hand springs and walking on his hands.

On the other side of the building that contained Papa's harness shop was a store. The storekeeper purchased a large quantity of baking powder and promoted its sale by conducting a contest. The person buying the most baking powder would be the winner. The prize was a new stove. Eventually the baking powder spoiled, so the storekeeper gave the rest of it to Edgar and me. We made pretty mud pies and had so much fun. We played together so much, and hardly ever fought.

If we had a penny or two we went to the store to buy candy. I was delegated to buy the jelly beans. The storekeeper always gave me more jelly beans than he gave Edgar, because I had curls. Edgar and I would divide them up, color for color, and would even cut one in two if they


did not come out even. Edgar always ate his first and then wanted some of mine.

We lived just down a path from Guy and Marie. They had two children, Leslie and Alma. Although I was only four years older than Leslie, I helped to take care of him. One day while going up the porch steps carrying Leslie, a strong gust of wind blew us down onto the cellar steps. I held Leslie up in the air and fell on my back so he would not get hurt. He still teases me about throwing him down the cellar steps.

After Guy tired of me visiting at his place and wanted me to go home, he wouldn't say a word. He would reach into his pocket, take out his knife and start sharpening it. I would take off for home on a dead run. Guy would laugh. I had webbed toes. Guy had told me that someday he would cut my webbed toes apart. We were playing church one day.
Edgar stood on a pile of wood and pretended to be the preacher, while I represented the congregation. After he finished delivering his sermon, Edgar jumped down, fell on Papa's chopping block, and cut his head open. I ran into the house screaming, "Edgar's eye is out! Edgar's eye is out!"

Mama saw all the blood, but couldn't see Edgar's eye. I was really frightened. Marie grabbed one of Leslie's diapers, wiped off Edgar's face, and said, "His eye is all right." The doctor stitched the cut above Edgar's eye and ordered him to spend some time resting in bed.
Neighbors brought him cakes and candy that he shared with me.

Papa made skis for us out of barrel staves. There was a hill by our house that was too steep to be used as a road during the snowy winter months. We sure put some white hairs on mama's head.

Papa had three brothers, Uncle Frank, Uncle Carol, and Uncle Lester. He also had two sisters, Aunt Carie and Aunt Eva. I knew them all well, except Uncle Frank. Uncle Frank was short and heavy set. All the others were tall and slender.

Grandma Gilbert (Mary {Watts} Gilbert) lived with us in the house by the Bell School until her death on May 27, 1912. I was only four years


old, but I remember that she insisted I put her stockings and shoes on her. One morning I told Mama I did not want to do it. Mama told me I did not have to. Grandma looked down at her feet, shook her head, and finally put on her own shoes and stockings as well as anyone could have. She told us that she never slept, but we could hear her snoring night and day.
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TABLE OF CONTENTS

FOREWORD 1 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1111#p1111
PREFACE 2 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1112#p1112
TABLE OF CONTENTS 4 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1113#p1113
BEGINNING IN LATAH 7 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1114#p1114
HOMESTEADING IN DUBOIS 13 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1115#p1115
RETURN TO LATAH 16 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1116#p1116
GREAT-GRANDFATHER AND
GREAT-GRANDMOTHER TOZIER 17 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1116#p1116
GRANDFATHERS 20 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1117#p1117
GROWING UP 21 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1118#p1118
CHILDHOOD FRIENDS AND GOOD TIMES 25 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1119#p1119
HOLIDAYS AND CELEBRATIONS 34 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1120#p1120
WORKING IN LATAH 37 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1121#p1121
MEMORIES OF PAPA 40 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1122#p1122
WORLD WAR I 42 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1123#p1123
FLUE EPIDEMIC 43 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1124#p1124
INVENTIONS 44 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1125#p1125
SCHOOL SPORTS 45 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1126#p1126
MEETING LEONARD 47 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1127#p1127
VEVA'S TEACHING 49 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1128#p1128
FATHER'S DEATH 51 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1129#p1129
VISIT TO GUY AND MARIE IN WYOMING 53 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1130#p1130
MARRIAGE TO LEONARD 55 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1131#p1131
BIRTH OF GILBERT 60 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1132#p1132
OUR MOVE TO MARSHALL 62 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1133#p1133
VEVA'S FAMILY 64 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1134#p1134
OUR MOVE TO KENNEWICK 67 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1135#p1135
BIRTH OF BONITA 70 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1136#p1136
OUR CHILDREN'S GROWING YEARS 71 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1137#p1137
GERTRUDE 78 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1138#p1138
THE DEPRESSION 81 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1139#p1139
GUY'S FAMILY 82 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1140#p1140
ROCK HOUNDING 85 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1141#p1141
EDGAR'S FAMILY 88 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1142#p1142
MOVE TO THE GARDEN TRACT 94 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1143#p1143
WORLD WAR II 96 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1144#p1144
ELAINE 98 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1145#p1145
THE FLOOD OF 1948 99 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1146#p1146
PAUL 100 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1147#p1147
GRANDCHILDREN 101 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1148#p1148
SPOKANE LILAC FESTIVALS 103 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1149#p1149
HARVESTING GRAPES 104 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1150#p1150
MY FAMILY IN 1968 105 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1151#p1151
HEARTACHES 108 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1152#p1152
FIFTIETH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY 112 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1153#p1153
SIXTIETH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY 113 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1154#p1154
SIXTY-NINTH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY 114 https://bb.chewack.com/viewtopic.php?p=1155#p1155
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PREFACE

THIS STORY IS AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A CHRISTIAN WOMAN, WHOSE ACCOUNT OF LIVING IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AS A CHILD DURING THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY THROUGH TODAY AS A GRANDMOTHER AND GREAT-GRANDMOTHER PROVIDES A DESCRIPTION OF PIONEER LIFE DURING THE PERIOD WHEN THE FRONTIERS OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST WERE BEING SETTLED.

THE WAGON TRAINS HAD DELIVERED THEIR CARGO, AND NOW THE SETTLERS WERE LEARNING TO LIVE IN THEIR NEW LAND. LIVING WAS HARD AND DEMANDING. DREAMS WERE SOMETIMES SHATTERED BY TRAGEDY. MOTHERS WITHOUT AN ABLE HUSBAND PARTNER AND PROVIDER FOUND IT DIFFICULT TO PROSPER. TRAGEDY AND SORROW VISITED RELENTLESSLY WITH LITTLE MERCY AND NO COMPENSATION. SURVIVAL WAS DIFFICULT, IMPOSSIBLE FOR MANY, AND REQUIRED TEDIOUS AND HARD LABOR FROM THOSE WHO SUCCEEDED.

ELMA JOY GILBERT WAS BORN ON MARCH 4, 1908 IN THE SMALL FARMING TOWN OF LATAH IN THE EASTERN PART OF WASHINGTON STATE. THIS STORY ALSO TOUCHES ON THE INFLUENCE, GLAMOUR, AND ATTRACTION OF THE LARGE CITY OF SPOKANE, APPROXIMATELY 50 MILES TO THE WEST. SOON AFTER MARRIAGE MRS. WAGENAAR MOVED TO KENNEWICK, WASHINGTON WHERE SHE ENJOYED BEING A MOTHER, A GRANDMOTHER, AND LOVING INTERACTIONS WITH HER FAMILY, CHURCH, AND NEIGHBORS..

THROUGH IT ALL, LOVE, FAITH, HOPE, JOY, AND PERSEVERANCE ENABLED THE SURVIVORS TO CONQUER THE HARDSHIPS. HUMOROUS EVENTS WERE RECOGNIZED AND CHERISHED, AS WERE THOUGHTFUL ACTIONS OF


RELATIVES, FRIENDS, AND NEIGHBORS. FAITH IN A CARING SUPREME BEING AND THE PROMISE OF AN ETERNAL REWARD FOR THE STEADFAST PROVIDED THE STRENGTH AND COURAGE FOR PIONEERS LIKE MRS. WAGENAAR TO LIVE THE VICTORIOUS LIFE.

THIS MOVING TRUE STORY OF A JOYOUS JOURNEY THROUGH LIFE CAN BE ENJOYED BY TODAY'S AMERICANS WHO ARE SEARCHING FOR A CLEARER UNDERSTANDING OF THEIR HERITAGE. MRS. WAGENAAR AND HER FAMILY SUFFERED GREAT LOSES FROM BOTH THE FIRST AND SECOND WORLD WARS AS WELL AS FROM OTHER TRAGEDIES. SHE PRAYED THAT THIS RECORD OF HER EXPERIENCES AND ENCOUNTERS WOULD BECOME AN INSPIRATION, A COMFORT, AND A LIVING TESTIMONY OF HER ETERNAL PROVIDER, JESUS CHRIST, TO YOU, THE READER.

EDGAR ROBERT GILBERT, Ph.D.

SON OF MRS. WAGENAAR'S BROTHER, EDGAR ROSS GILBERT
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JOURNEY OF JOY
ELMA JOY GILBERT WAGENAAR



FOREWORD

My daughter-in-law asked me one day why I didn't write my life story. I told her I didn't think it would be interesting enough. However, after thinking about it, I realized that anyone who had raised a family has a whole lot to write about.

This book is an autobiographic account of memories passed down from Mrs. Elma Joy Wagenaar to Edgar Robert Gilbert, the eldest son of her brother, Edgar Ross Gilbert.


First Edition: DECEMBER 1987 First Revision: JANUARY 1996 Second Revision:
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JOURNEY OF JOY
ELMA JOY GILBERT WAGENAAR

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https://youtu.be/aXZo4U15Ld0
Haiku THE Movie
Haiku THE Movie
Terry Hunt
Terry Hunt
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Dennis Morgan
Dennis Morgan
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PAL wrote: Thu Aug 12, 2021 7:56 pm Thank you Tristen. I love Merle Haggard and our own Terry Lee Hardesty is a fantastic musician. This must have been exciting for you.
I also love that North Cr. trail. Hope the fire stays out of there. But what will be will be.
Pearl
LIGHTNING Storm in DEEP CREEK 07-23-2019 WEST PLAINS of Spokane County WA.-10205842548499540_gif.gif
MUSIC MAKES PICTURES
I love being part of Terry Lee Hardesty and The Last Outlaws
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Thank you Tristen. I love Merle Haggard and our own Terry Lee Hardesty is a fantastic musician. This must have been exciting for you.
I also love that North Cr. trail. Hope the fire stays out of there. But what will be will be.
Pearl
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Terry introducing me to Merle Haggard
Terry introducing me to Merle Haggard
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Terry Lee Hardesty and Merle Haggard
Terry Lee Hardesty and Merle Haggard
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I AM
i shall be
Jehovah is my friend
Trust in the love of Jesus the Prophet and friend
WASHED IN THE BLOOD OF JESUS
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Stars in the Movie Gold Creek
Stars in the Movie Gold Creek
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Gilbert Mountain North Creek Trail
Gilbert Mountain North Creek Trail
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Hehe I-m Very Mature-jZD1QyDAOXo_gif.gif
Spin Straw into Gold
LOVE
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North Lake is where my heart turned...
I was bad and turned better and looked to the goodness that I could be
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